Skip to content

Category Archives: History

The Bornite Identity

Movie puns are obviously the best way to start the week. Well, second best. The best way to kick off this week is Mineral Monday. Bornite is commonly known as Peacock ore, for obvious reasons. The bright iridescence of Bornite (Cu5FeS4) is actually a tarnish on the surface of the mineral. If you cut into […]

Momentous Discoveries: Impacts and Gene Shoemaker

Accretionary Wedge #60 is all about Momentous Discoveries in Earth Science Even before the Apollo missions. Eugene Merle Shoemaker wanted to go to the moon. A geologist by training, he figured that it was only logical-if we were going to go explore the surface of another world, shouldn’t you send someone who understood how this […]

Another Earthquake in Iran, 600-year-old Murder Mystery, and Armor Piercing Cannonballs

  Today, the news is rightfully dominated by the marathon bombings in Boston, but while we’re mourning, reading about news in other parts of the world might be a helpful distraction. Here’s your weekly round-up of rock-related news. Geology For the second week in a row, a major earthquake strikes Iran, this time in the southern […]

Context, Calcite and Vikings

The vikings are in the news again, and not just for their new show on the History Channel. I’ve talked about calcite’s amazing optical properties before, but completely failed to mention* the theory that calcite is potentially the same as a tool called the sunstone, rumored to be used by viking navigators to navigate the […]

Rome, Scotland, and Stake-Lined Pits

I was going through some old pictures the other day, and came across this image, and I was so excited that I just had to share! These may look like holes in the ground…and they are. But once, long ago they were one of the many lines of defense that the Romans used to secure […]